Dairy And Meat Alternatives Stay On Top Of U.S. Food Investors’ Mind

A new report tracking the U.S. food and beverage investment in 2018 reveals about one-third of the total funding went to dairy- and meat-alternative products, with other categories, including CBD, keto, chips and salty snacks, also receiving a decent amount of investment. The report, compiled by Ryan Williams who directs finance and special projects at Rise Brewing Co., was published on Food + Tech Connect in June. It notes that 2018 saw $1.45bn invested across 200 disclosed transactions in total, with the largest deal involving a $114m funding to the plant-based meat…

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Ethiopia, Kenya to benefit from $169m U.S. food aid

The United States has extended food and health aid totaling $169m, the U.S. government’s humanitarian relief agency, USAID, has announced. The bulk of the funds will go to Ethiopia who are set to benefit to the tune of $137 million with the remaining going to neighbouring Kenya. Part of Ethiopia’s fund includes enough food to feed 3 million people. According to a USAIDstatement, the Trump administration approved the aid principally to feed people starving in both countries. With this new funding, the United States is scaling up emergency food assistance, while providing…

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Wal-Mart shuffles U.S. leadership teams in food, merchandising

A general view shows a Wal-Mart store in Monterrey, Mexico, August 10, 2016.Daniel Becerril/File Photo CHICAGO (Reuters) – Wal-Mart Stores Inc (WMT.N) has announced changes to its food leadership team in an internal memo, as it prepares for increased competition with grocery rivals and remains caught in a price war. Charles Redfield, executive vice-president for food at Wal-Mart U.S., unveiled the changes in the memo dated Friday and seen by Reuters. He said Wal-Mart is positioning leaders from the company in new roles so it can deliver and win at…

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Skandera possible pick for U.S. education secretary

Hanna Skandera, New Mexico’s public education secretary, is reportedly under consideration for a top education job in President-elect Donald Trump’s administration. Politico reported Friday that Skandera, who has sparred with teachers unions and drawn criticism for her support of the PARCC standardized testing system in New Mexico, could be offered a job as education deputy secretary or undersecretary of the department. Skandera told The Associated Press two weeks ago she had not been approached about a job in the Trump administration, but that may have changed. A Skandera spokesman declined…

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How the U.S. Army Personalized Its Mental Health Care

The U.S. Army’s efforts to come to grips with a dramatic upsurge in war-related behavioral conditions over the past 13 years holds valuable lessons for bringing precision mental health care to the civilian world. Virtually everyone realizes that precision medicine, which aims to tailor care to the individual patient’s needs, is essential. Yet in attempts to bring patient-centered, outcomes-based approaches to health care in recent years, mental health has taken a back seat to other areas of medical care. Almost alone among industrialized nations, the United States does not systematically…

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U.S. Health Spending in 2015 Averaged Nearly $10,000 Per Person

WASHINGTON — Total spending on health care in the United States increased last year at the fastest rate since the 2008 recession, reaching $3.2 trillion, or an average of nearly $10,000 a person, the Department of Health and Human Services reported on Friday. The growth coincided with continuing increases in the number of Americans with insurance coverage, through private health plans or Medicaid. Federal spending on health care has increased by 21 percent over the past two years, as millions of Americans gained coverage through the Affordable Care Act, the…

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Angry, anti-Trump protests surge across U.S.

Another night of nationwide protests against Donald Trump’s U.S. election win came to a head in Portland, Ore., where thousands marched and some smashed store windows, lit firecrackers and sparked a dumpster blaze. Police termed the protest a riot and used “less lethal munitions” to help clear the streets. Some 4,000 protesters surged into the downtown area late Thursday night with chants like “We reject the president-elect!” Officers began physically pushing back against the crowd that, at times, threw objects at them as midnight approached, arresting 26 people and using flash-bang…

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U.S. Education Department Awards $4.4 Million to Improve Literacy and Education Outcomes for Students with Disabilities

The U.S. Department of Education today announced more than $4.4 million in grants to improve literacy skills, outcomes and results for children with disabilities. “When we improve literacy skills for children with disabilities, including those with dyslexia, we are not just teaching them how to read, we are opening doors to a lifetime of more positive opportunities, such as improved academic skills, reduction in behavioral incidences, increased school completion, and lifelong learning,” said U.S. Secretary of Education John B. King Jr. “These awards will continue to address inclusion, equity and…

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Dialysis used more often in U.S. than other developed nations

– Compared to other developed countries, a significantly higher portion of chronic kidney disease patients in the United States received renal replacement therapy, or dialysis, raising questions about decision-making among clinicians who prescribe it. More than 85 percent of patients in a recent study either received dialysis treatment or were preparing to start, according to a review of data published in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. In most countries, dialysis is age-dependent and is less likely to be prescribed at older ages because it does not…

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