Late evening eating may compromise women’s heart health

New research finds that eating more calories in the evening is associated with poorer cardiovascular health in women. Share on PinterestEating more of the day’s calories after 6 p.m. is linked with poorer heart health in a new study. Evidence is accumulating that meal times can impact cardiometabolic health. One recent study, for example, showed that eating meals earlier in the day can help people lose weight, while eating later in the day may promote weight gain and slow down metabolism. These studies also showed that later mealtimes raise inflammatory markers that are…

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Diet and lifestyle key for a good heart

CHENNAI : The heart is a vital organ as it pumps blood, and delivers oxygen and other nutrients throughout the body. Hence maintaining a good, healthy heart is important. Certain foods will increase cholesterol levels in the blood, increase blood pressure and this will have an impact on heart diseases. FOODS TO INCLUDESoluble fiber: Helps lower blood cholesterol levels, reduces risk of heart disease. Sources include fresh fruits and vegetables, beans and lentils.Tea: Contains catechins and flavonoids, which helps maintain healthy blood vessels. Green tea is rich in antioxidants. Dark…

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Lifestyle, not genetics, explains most premature heart disease

Physical inactivity, smoking, high blood pressure, diabetes, and high cholesterol play a greater role than genetics in many young patients with heart disease, according to research presented today at ESC Congress 2019 together with the World Congress of Cardiology. The findings show that healthy behaviours should be a top priority for reducing heart disease even in those with a family history of early onset. “Genetics are an important contributor to premature heart disease but should not be used as an excuse to say it is inevitable,” said study author Dr…

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Heart health: THIS food item has great benefits for your heart – Reduce risk of heart attack, strokes

Keeping your heart healthy can be made easier by reaping benefits from certain food items. Soya is a common food item consumed in Indian households in the form of curry, dry vegetable, kebabs, etc. Heart health: Here is how eating soya can improve your heart’s health!  |  Photo Credit: Getty Images New Delhi: The heart is one of the most vital organs of the body and its normal functioning determines many other body functions. Keeping your heart healthy is a job in itself – you need to eat right, sleep right, drink…

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High protein diet for weight loss may backfire as it increases risk of heart failure

High protein diet have always enjoyed a lot of popularity among fitness conscious folk. Many people who are looking to shed some weight are recommended a high protein diet. But is it really healthy, asks a new study. According to this study, a high-protein diet could increase the risk of heart failure in middle-aged men. However, proteins from fish and eggs were not associated with heart failure risk in this study. “As many people seem to take the health benefits of high-protein diets for granted, it is important to make…

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Ramphal (Bullock’s Heart) Benefits And Ways To Use It In Your Daily Diet!

Mother Nature has bestowed us with a plethora of amazing fruits that have abundant health promoting properties. Out of the treasure trove of beautiful looking fruits, there is ramphal, also known as bullock’s heart, which is known to have numerous health and beauty benefits. This green coloured ripened fruit is believed to have high amounts of antioxidants, vitamin C, calcium, phosphorus and a generous amount of iron content in it. The phytonutrients make this fruit an unmissable bet. Did you know that ramphal belongs to the same family as custard apple, which is the…

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PROFILE: Santa Anzo on fashion and heart matters

Santa Anzo is one of Uganda’s top fashion emblems. She has represented the country on multiple international fashion festivals including Fashion for Peace international initiative, Kenya fashion Week, Mozambique Fashion Week, Swahili Fashion Week in Dar-es-Salaam and Africa Fashion Month among others. She started out professionally as a model with fashion icon Sylvia Owori’s then Ziper Models. “It was not only the first professional modeling agency that I was attached to but it took me through a fabulous experience,” she says of Ziper. Back then she was a dark, tall…

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Sleep deprivation can affect your heart

Sleep deprivation can affect your heart (Thinkstock) The cliched, over-used adages about sleeping early might not be something that most people take seriously, but cardiologists and sleep experts swear by them. Doctors say that losing quality and quantity sleep is detrimental to our health. Senior interventional cardiologist, Dr Nilesh Gautam, says, “Sleep disorders cause an increase in blood pressure, heart rate and thyroid hormones, which is indicative of a stress response. This leads to increase heart attack and heart failures.” Experts reiterate that people who sleep less than seven hours…

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Heart disease risk: Genetics vs lifestyle choices – Which is higher?

New Delhi: Heart disease is the single largest cause of death in India, with heart attack claiming one life every 33 seconds, making it responsible for one-third of all deaths caused by heart conditions. Currently the country is seeing nearly two million heart attacks a year and majority of the victims are youngsters, as per cardiologists. Heart disease, also known as cardiovascular disease, is also the number one killer in the Unites States. Most people have a family history for heart disease that increases an individual’s risk of developing the…

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TBI Blogs: Do You Think Diabetes or Heart Disease Is A “Genetic Problem”? You Need to Read This!

Everyone needs to understand that our genes are just one factor, one cog in the wheel that takes us hurtling towards the path of lifestyle disease-dom. Kavita Devgan explores the multiple factors that cause lifestyle diseases, and how to overcome them. Most of the time, we conveniently blame our genes for any health disorder that affects us. “Oh, both my aunts have diabetes, so I knew I would get it too,” a 35-year-old professional told me just last week. In fact, I hear this – or a variation of it – all the time.…

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