A multi-layered love affair with sandwiches

Thursday was grilled cheese sandwich day. A good excuse to dive into India’s most iconic versions, from spicy fry-ups to Bombay toast The Indian take on sandwiches defies definition. At times, it is a filling and greasy fry-up. At others, it’s a reinterpretation of a native recipe in a handy bite-sized package. Although bread and buns were introduced to India by her colonial rulers, the Portuguese and the British, they have been inextricably blended into the country’s colourful culinary landscape. While the meaning of the word ‘sandwich’ has got extended…

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8 Innovative Samosa Fillings to Make Snack Time a Lip-Smacking Affair

A traditionalsamosa is perhaps the most popular Indian appetiser or street food . Talking about samosas, the first thing that we visualise is fried, golden pyramids stuffed with spicy potatoes and green peas along with peanuts and raisins put in for good measure. Samosa is said to have originated in the Middle East (where it is known as sambosa), and was introduced to the Indian subcontinent by traders from central Asia. Today, they have become the most favourite and generic snack among Indians. We Indians love to give international food an Indian taste; that is why hamburgers…

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Is Fashion’s Love Affair With Washington Over?

On Wednesday, when Hillary Clinton stood in the New Yorker Hotel for her farewell speech, she did so in one of her signature Ralph Lauren pantsuits. Dark gray, with purple lapels and a matching purple shirt (and a matching purple tie for Bill Clinton), it underscored, as so many of her fashion choices did in the run-up to the election, a point: the way two colors/factions — red and blue — can unite to make something new. But it also symbolized, perhaps, the end of what might have been an…

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Dining with death: crime fiction’s long affair with food

In “The Noble Bachelor” Sherlock Holmes presents Watson with a brace of woodcock and a pâté de foie gras pie. Holmes himself was partial to curried chicken and mixed his own blend of earl grey and lapsang souchong. Inspector Maigret would make a detour for skate wings with black butter, mussels in cream and choucroute. American mystery writer Rex Stout’s Nero Wolfe weighed “a seventh of a ton”, and employed a Swiss chef called Fritz who made him “Shad roe mousse Pocahontas” and “Avocado Todhunter” (a rather anaemic combination of…

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