What we love about food in 2017

Grape, Olive, Pig by Matt Goulding Few writers immerse themselves so fully in their subject as Matt Goulding, whose first book Rice, Noodle, Fish was a deep dive into the obsessions at the heart of Japanese food culture and an OFM favourite. Goulding’s beat is understanding places where food and life remain intertwined, so where better for him to write about next than Spain? His wife’s family are Spanish and bonding with them meant helping his father-in-law, Angel, in the annual slaughter of a pig, helped by great uncle Chacho,…

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Tacos: The 2017 food trend we can all get behind

I can’t tell you how little I wanted to like Breddos. The new taqueria in Clerkenwell has the restaurant version of a punchable face. It is tiny, one step up from the shack in a car park that was its original incarnation. Most of the seats – sorry, stools, no chairs with backs in these parts – are around a large communal table or crammed against the edges of the room. The single loo opens more or less directly onto the eating area. When you arrive you are told there’s…

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Millennials, We Need Your Help To Fix Health Care

Seventy-five years ago, America and the free world faced an existential threat from the Axis powers—and the so-called “greatest generation” responded. There’s no doubt that people who were 18 to 35 years old in 1942 paid the heaviest price earning their place in the pantheon of history. I believe, today, our country faces a challenge of that magnitude. If one takes a sober look at collateral damage from an extremely expensive and dysfunctional health care system, both to doctors and patients, I believe that we have gone to war for…

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Trump could gut public health funding at the exact time we need it most

We’re hearing a lot about the 22 million people who may lose their health insurance if the Affordable Care Act is repealed. But there’s another, quieter tragedy that could play out if the ACA is gutted: States could lose critical funding for public-health efforts like responding to outbreaks, vaccination programs, and anti-smoking and anti-obesity campaigns. When the ACA was enacted in 2010, the law established the Prevention and Public Health Fund, with an annual appropriation that began at $500 million in 2010. The goal of the fund was simple: boost…

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Why do we love and hate different tastes?

Why do people like one type of food and really dislike another? How much are our responses to food, including putting on weight, influenced by genetics? And could the taste of food be chemically re-engineered to appeal to particular groups, such as the elderly? A unique summit of some of the world’s leading chefs and top scientists put our complicated relationship with food under the microscope. This “Brainy Tongue” experiment, a collision of science and cooking, took place in San Sebastian in the Basque region of northern Spain, a seaside…

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The Boxes We Keep Forcing Students Into In The Name Of Education

When I was in school, I thought I knew what I wanted to be in life. I had a few options, with the little I had seen growing up: 1. A Catholic priest 2. A rockstar 3. A doctor I pursued the first early on, got bored of the second and gave up option three in junior college when I couldn’t prick my own finger for a blood sample. I had chosen science after high school, and later on graduated as a math major. I really liked math, I wasn’t…

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How do we avoid the antibiotics apocalypse?

Every year, at least 700,000 people die from drug-resistant infections. It is why government scientists have described antibiotic resistance as one of the greatest global threats of the 21st Century. So what are people doing to try to avert the so-called antibiotics apocalypse? Well, it turns out, quite a lot. First, there are those who are trying to get us to take fewer antibiotics. That is because the more antibiotics we all take, the more resistant bacteria become. Jason Doctor, a psychologist at the University of Southern California, has been…

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5 things we learned at Bitten L.A. about the future of food

Today was the first time that Bitten, a food conference based in New York, was held in L.A., and there was plenty of knowledge being dropped on the food-focused crowd. Panelists included Sean Raspet, flavorist at Soylent; Maude Standish, a trend forecaster; Scott Winegard, executive chef at Matthew Kenney Cuisine; L.A.’s very own Jonathan Gold and more. At the Galley Theater at Barnsdall Art Park, everything from supper clubs to cannabis cooking was discussed, but a common theme throughout the talks was the future of food. Here are five predictions…

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Higher education has collapsed in India, we just don’t know it yet

The failure of Indian education system is stark when seen in light of the fact that thousands of students every year go abroad for college education. European universities and even the European governments seem to have a more definite plan for Indian students than India. A graduate degree in India is mostly a farce in most of the colleges. There is hardly any education imparted and it is seen as more a stepping stone for a masters or a necessity to do something else. Students file into colleges spend their…

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How can we put the taste back into British food?

Four strawberries, picked an hour earlier, sit on a saucer on the dining-room table of Lindsey Lodge Farm, a 40-acre farm growing fruit and vegetables in Suffolk. It is June and these strawberries are the first of the English season. Andrew Sturgeon, a farmer for 30 years, smiles, certain of the quality. The aroma is heady, the taste is of strawberries as they ought to be, naturally sweet. Sturgeon delivers to 45 stores belonging to the East of England Co-operative, owned by its members. It is independent from the Co-operative…

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