Apple Scientists Disclose Self-Driving Car Research

Research by Apple computer scientists on how self-driving cars can better spot cyclists and pedestrians while using fewer sensors has been posted online, in what appears to be the company’s first publicly disclosed paper on autonomous vehicles. The paper by Yin Zhou and Oncel Tuzel, submitted on Nov. 17 to independent online journal arXiv, is significant because Apple’s famed corporate secrecy around future products has been seen as a drawback among artificial intelligence and machine learning researchers. The scientists proposed a new software approach called “VoxelNet” for helping computers detect three-dimensional objects. Apple declined to…

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Jellyfish help scientists to fight food fraud

Animals feeding at sea inherit a chemical record reflecting the area where they fed, which can help track their movements, according to a new study by scientists from the University of Southampton. Chemical testing of the source of marine food products could be a powerful tool to help to fight food fraud, maintain healthy sustainable fish stocks or marine protected areas, and ensure consumer confidence in marine eco-labelling. Tracing the location of marine animals is difficult as they generally can’t be seen and are often a long way from the…

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Food scientists using X-rays to figure out fats

The researchers hope to replace unhealthful trans and saturated fats with better non-saturated versions — all without compromising texture. That swap could have great implications for the food industry, says Maria Fernanda Peyronel-Svaikauskas, a research associate working with food scientist Prof. Alejandro Marangoni. To conduct their studies, Peyronel-Svaikauskas and the other U of G researchers use the DOE’s Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory in Lemont, Illinois. X-rays generated at that facility enable scientists to study and characterize the structure of edible fats at meso and micro levels…

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Making babies without eggs may be possible, say scientists

They have succeeded in creating healthy baby mice by tricking sperm into believing they were fertilising normal eggs. The findings in Nature Communications, could, in the distant future, mean women can be removed from the baby-making process, say the researchers. For now, the work helps to explain some of the details of fertilisation. End of mum and dad? The University of Bath scientists started with an unfertilised egg in their experiments. They used chemicals to trick it into becoming a pseudo-embryo. These “fake” embryos share much in common with ordinary…

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Scientists Discover New Nutrition Model to Help Fight Obesity

Calling for a radical rethinking of human nutrition science, scientists have developed a new framework called “nutritional geometry” which is the culmination of more than 20 years of research in the field. According to the authors, the new model will assist health professionals, dietitians and researchers to better understand and manage the complexities of obesity. The new model shows that protein has been the strongest driver influencing diet, regulating the intake of fat and carbohydrate. “Existing models for measuring health impacts of the human diet are limiting our capacity to…

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