What we love about food in 2017

Grape, Olive, Pig by Matt Goulding Few writers immerse themselves so fully in their subject as Matt Goulding, whose first book Rice, Noodle, Fish was a deep dive into the obsessions at the heart of Japanese food culture and an OFM favourite. Goulding’s beat is understanding places where food and life remain intertwined, so where better for him to write about next than Spain? His wife’s family are Spanish and bonding with them meant helping his father-in-law, Angel, in the annual slaughter of a pig, helped by great uncle Chacho,…

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Why Fashion Will Learn to Love Melania Trump

NEW YORK, United States — After multiple magazine covers and overseas visits, countless state dinners and late-night talk show appearances, there is no question that Michelle Obama has had an unusually fruitful relationship with fashion during her time as First Lady of the United States. But in the wake of Donald Trump’s victory in a highly divisive presidential election, during which most of the fashion community was vocal in its support for Hillary Clinton, Melania Trump’s future relationship with fashion — and fashion magazines — remains uncertain. Vogue editor-in-chief Anna Wintour was a dedicated fundraiser for Clinton, as…

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Is Fashion’s Love Affair With Washington Over?

On Wednesday, when Hillary Clinton stood in the New Yorker Hotel for her farewell speech, she did so in one of her signature Ralph Lauren pantsuits. Dark gray, with purple lapels and a matching purple shirt (and a matching purple tie for Bill Clinton), it underscored, as so many of her fashion choices did in the run-up to the election, a point: the way two colors/factions — red and blue — can unite to make something new. But it also symbolized, perhaps, the end of what might have been an…

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Why do we love and hate different tastes?

Why do people like one type of food and really dislike another? How much are our responses to food, including putting on weight, influenced by genetics? And could the taste of food be chemically re-engineered to appeal to particular groups, such as the elderly? A unique summit of some of the world’s leading chefs and top scientists put our complicated relationship with food under the microscope. This “Brainy Tongue” experiment, a collision of science and cooking, took place in San Sebastian in the Basque region of northern Spain, a seaside…

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Why insect pests love monocultures, and how plant diversity could change that

A study led by the University of California, Davis, and published Oct. 12 in the journal Nature explains that much of it may have to do with the nutritional needs of insects. Returning plant diversity to farmland could be a key step toward sustainable pest control. “Insects have a perfect nutrient level that they really like,” said lead author William Wetzel, a doctoral student in Population Biology at UC Davis at the time of the study and currently an assistant professor at Michigan State University. “When it’s too high or…

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