GOP health care working group runs into early obstacles

(CNN)Republican senators are grappling this week with how they can find consensus between their moderate and conservative factions on health care while still managing to get the 50 votes they need to gut the Affordable Care Act. It’s tough math and although it is early in the process, so far the GOP’s health care working group — a collection of 13 GOP senators — has already encountered some of the same hurdles that hindered the House’s efforts, which struggled for weeks to collect enough votes to pass. After last week’s…

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Republican voters criticize health bill amid fears over pre-existing conditions

Matthew Frankic: ‘I am not for what they brought out.’ Photograph: Justin Gilliland for the Guardian Matthew Frankic, a health insurance broker and Republican voter, makes his living signing people up for the Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare. Since the law went into effect in 2014, he has seen flaws. Each year, health insurance in his section of southern Indiana has seemed to cost more, and fewer doctors and hospitals seemed to accept it. But he supported the unpopular Republican effort to reform the law until he heard…

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Who Wins and Who Loses in the Latest G.O.P. Health Care Bill

A group protesting outside the St. Joseph, Mich., office of Representative Fred Upton on Wednesday. Mr. Upton has emerged as a crucial supporter of the latest effort to revive the G.O.P.’s health care bill.CreditDon Campbell/The Herald-Palladium, via Associated Press The American Health Care Act, which narrowly won passage in the House on Thursday, could transform the nation’s health insurance system and create a new slate of winners and losers. While the Senate will probably demand changes, this bill, if it becomes law in its current form, will repeal and replace…

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Women’s Health: Teeth Loss Post Menopause May Increase Death Risk

Menopauses or climacteric caused by the decrease in hormones is a phase when women don’t menstruate anymore and can’t conceive a baby. Every woman at an average of 45 years of age goes through this biological change in the body, further involving several other changes. Some common symptoms that are noticed by women at least a year before menopause include change in flow of blood and frequency, hot flashes, night sweats and disturbed sleeping patterns. Post menopause too the body faces several changes, some also leading to severe health problems….

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Now, get updated on health of structures

Researcher showcases it at new flyover in Thagarapuvalasa in Visakhapatnam A city-based engineering expert has developed state- of-the-art real-time vibration and condition monitoring systems using photonic technology to assess the structural health of railway track, bridges, and other infrastructure. Patent applied The breakthrough, for which patent application has been submitted, was showcased at the new flyover at Thagarapuvalasa, about 40 km from here, before Director-General (Road Development), Ministry of Transport and Highways, S.N. Das, on Saturday. Mr. Das told The Hindu that they would consider examining the efficacy of the…

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Health fears grow over fashionable ‘grumpy’ flat-faced cats

First it was dogs, now its flat faced cats who are paying the price of being in fashion. Persians, British and Exotic Shorthair cats are increasingly suffering from health problems because their characteristic shortened muzzle features have become more extreme through breeding. Vets have warned that this can lead to breathing difficulties, along with eye and skin infections, because of constricted nasal passages. In some cases the cats even have problems picking up food because of their flattened ‘grumpy’ faces. A recent study by researchers at the University of Edinburgh…

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A hotspot for health care

Contours of a booming industry: The health tourism market is booming in Turkey with the number of medical tourists travelling there for plastic surgery, hair transplants, nose surgeries and organ transplants doubling in the past two years. Clients, predominantly from Arab and European countries, often come in tour groups. Turkey’s Health Ministry is looking to boost the numbers of medical tourists to two million and eyeing a revenue target of $20 billion by 2023 by introducing tax-free health-care zones targeted at foreign patients. Picture shows a patient being prepared for…

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Brainstorm Health Daily: February 15, 2017

Merck is the latest company to weather bad news in the Alzheimer’s drug race, halting a late-stage trial yesterday in an experimental amyloid-targeting candidate called verubecestat after a data monitoring committee said there was “virtually no chance of finding a positive clinical effect,” Reuters reported. Merck shares got hammered in after-hours trading Tuesday evening and during the early morning rush, but had fully recovered by mid-morning. (The stock is actually at a 52-week high now.) Who knows? Maybe savvy traders expected the rotten news. After all, Merck simply joins a…

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The confused future of health care

With a new administration in Washington, it’s widely accepted that the Affordable Care Act (ACA), otherwise known as Obamacare, isn’t likely to survive in its current form. But nobody seems to know whether it will be replaced or repealed, or what shape health care coverage will take in the future. The experts who met for a Kennedy Schoolpanel on the subject Monday evening didn’t presume to answer those questions, but they did pinpoint the crucial issues for the transition. While they disagreed on possible replacements, they agreed that any solution…

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Taking Care: Health charter goes beyond patient-doctor to whole world

– When updating the Catholic Church’s medical and bioethical charter, experts decided it wasn’t enough to aim the guidelines at health care professionals. The entire “ecosystem” encompassing medical workers, patients, the sick and vulnerable had to be addressed, said the head of the drafting committee. Everything in the system — laws, social policies, economic situations, war, injustice, drug and insurance companies, social and family networks and the environment — can have an impact on people’s right to life and access to basic healthcare, said Camillian Father Augusto Chendi, undersecretary delegate…

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