What You Should Know About the Pro-Vegan Netflix Film ‘What the Health’

The recent pro-vegan Netflix documentary, What the Health, is under fire from nutrition experts. The film, which is co-directed by Kip Andersen and Keegan Kuhn—the creators of another Netflix documentary, Cowspiracy—and co-produced by actor Joaquin Phoenix, is being criticized by some health professionals for exaggerating weak data and misrepresenting science to promote a diet that avoids all animal foods. TIME fact-checked the film. Here are four things that What the Health got wrong—and what it got right. No, eggs are not as bad for you as cigarettes The documentary claims that eating an egg a day is as bad for…

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The FDA Reauthorization Act Symbolizes Need for Bipartisan Health Care Solutions

The Republican Party promised that as soon as they were elected they would repeal and replace Obamacare. Six months later — after multiple failed attempts — there is only a glimmer of hope that our nation’s legislatures will still work to find better healthcare solutions for Americans. But just last week, in a rare bipartisan fashion, Senate Democrats and Republicans came together to pass the FDA Reauthorization Act. The bill, which passed without amendments from the House version passed in June, went straight to President Trump’s desk and is expected…

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Love Island: stars’ on-screen smoking angers health charity

Chloe Crowhurst, left, and Amber Davies smoke during a Love Island episode. Photograph: ITV The bedroom activities of Love Island’s glamorous contestants are providing many a watercooler moment in offices across the land. But their love of smoking is provoking an altogether different kind of debate. Amid growing concerns about the rise of smoking on screens and its influence on the young, the media regulator Ofcom has been asked by a leading health charity to investigate whether the show is in breach of strict codes governing lighting up on television. Action…

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The new Senate health care bill — and the return of preexisting conditions — explained

Senate Republicans introduced a revised version of their bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act on Thursday, one that would allow insurers to once again deny coverage based on preexisting conditions, and to charge higher rates to sick people. The bill would keep most of the Affordable Care Act’s tax increases but repeal one aimed specifically at medical device manufacturers. It would deeply cut the Medicaid program, making few changes to the bill’s first draft. Even with these new changes, the general structure of the bill stays the same from…

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The Senate GOP’s audacious health care Jedi mind trick

A strange line has trickled out from Senate Republicans in the past few days: We don’t even have a health care plan. Those 145 pages of detailed legislative text? The ones that were rigorously analyzed by the Congressional Budget Office? What are you talking about? It’s a Jedi mind trick for the ages. Vox’s Sarah Kliff wrote last month about the remarkable lengths Republicans have gone to to mislead and obfuscate about their health care plans. It was no accident that Senate leadership decided to draft its bill entirely out of public view. But denying the existence of a…

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Improved Vaccination Rates Would Fall Victim to Senate Health Cuts

Passage of the Senate’s health care bill, as proposed, would risk eroding national health in one little-discussed way, according to medical experts: It would eliminate cash that pays for vaccines to protect the most vulnerable among us from diseases like mumps, measles or the flu. Former Pres. Barack Obama’s Affordable Care Act (ACA) currently requires new health insurance plans to cover federally recommended vaccines for adults and children, without making patients share the costs through co-pays or deductibles—a “first dollar” coverage mandate meant to help Americans overcome the financial obstacle…

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Will losing health insurance mean more US deaths? Experts say yes

Disability advocates hold a protest outside the office of Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell on 22 June. Senate Republicans have released their draft healthcare bill. Photograph: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images View more sharing options Shares 1,258 Mona Chalabi @MonaChalabi email Saturday 24 June 2017 12.00 BST The Republican healthcare bill announced on Thursday would cause thousands of Americans to die each year, according to physicians who study government data. Using national health surveys, doctors and academics have tested whether a lack of health insurance increases the probability of death. Most have concluded…

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2 winners and 4 losers from the Senate health care bill

Mark Wilson/Getty Images The Better Care Reconciliation Act, Senate Republicans’ plan to repeal and replace Obamacare, would if passed lead to one of the largest redistributions of income in American history, just as Obamacare itself did. It would shift hundreds of billions of dollars from health care programs to fund sweeping tax cuts for rich Americans, radically overhaul the way the US supports elderly and disabled people, and allow states to substantially weaken insurance regulations. While it clearly does not yet have the votes it needs to pass the Senate,…

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Apple should buy Athenahealth to expand in health care: Citigroup

Sally Shin | CNBC Tim Cook As Apple moves into health care, it’s acquired a few small start-ups. Now, Citigroup analyst Garen Sarafian is recommending that the company scoop up a far larger player in health technology: Athenahealth. Even with a market capitalization of close to $6 billion, the purchase would make sense, Sarafian wrote in a note to clients, as it could help Apple solve one of the biggest’s issues in health care — the interoperable exchange of medical data. Sarafian’s analysis followed a report on Wednesday from CNBC…

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Cuts in federal housing help would hurt people’s health, research suggests

This article originally appeared on Kaiser Health News. Does investing in public housing keep people healthier? New research explores this question, which appears timely, especially as the Trump administration proposes to cut $7.4 billion — about 15 percent — from the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s budget, and HUD Secretary Ben Carson argues that too much government assistance fosters dependency and perpetuates cycles of poverty. The study, published Monday in the journal Health Affairs, found that receiving housing assistance from the federal government — through vouchers, public housing and…

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