Do Not Let Your Blood Pressure Go Unchecked, It May Lead to Stroke

One of the biggest challenges in curbing the increasing rate of high blood pressure cases is the inability to spot its occurrence and not taking enough preventive measure to keep the condition at bay. In most cases, hypertension is the product of a sedentary lifestyle coupled with unhealthy eating habits, poor sleep pattern, alcohol or tobacco abuse and high levels of stress and anxiety. Some symptoms for early detection include headache, chest discomfort, palpitations, shortness of breath, irregular heartbeat, nosebleeds and feeling numb or weak. Eating a well-balanced diet, sleeping…

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11 warning signs of increased blood sugar levels

Signs of increased blood sugar levels   With lifestyle diseases becoming rampant in India and the country being called the diabetes capital of the world, even young people are experiencing a spike in their blood sugar levels. High blood sugar levels occur when the glucose levels in your blood become elevated. This happens when your body’s insulin levels drop and it doesn’t have sufficient insulin to process the glucose. You may already know how crummy low blood sugar levels can make you, but what about the other side of the…

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This Commonly Used Blood Pressure Drug May Help Treat Skin Cancer

According to the World Health Organisation, the incidence of skin cancers has been increasingly rising. Both melanoma and non-melanoma types have been on the rise over the past decades. Statistics estimate close to 3 million non-melanoma global cases of skin cancers and 132,000 cases of melanoma skin cancers every year. More and more people are becoming susceptible to skin cancer owing to the rapidly depleting ozone levels. Experts from Western University of Health Sciences, US have found a novel possibility to treat skin cancer. A drug called carvedilol showed some…

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New blood test targets depression

UK scientists have developed a blood test to help doctors pick the best drug for patients with depression. Medics currently have to rely on trial and error, meaning around half of the time the first type of antidepressant given fails to work. The researchers from King’s College London say checking a patient’s blood could help identify accurate treatment. Those who test positive for inflammation need more aggressive therapy from the outset, they say. So far the researchers have tried out their blood test on a small number of volunteers –…

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